<div dir="ltr">Dear colleagues,<div><br></div><div>I have bittersweet news: the Wikimedia Foundation will not be funding the grant proposal for the upcoming meeting in Modra.  Please see the announcement on the grant proposal talk page:</div>

<div><a href="https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Grants_talk:Wikimedia_Slovakia/Wikimedia_CEE_Meeting_2013#Not_funded">https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Grants_talk:Wikimedia_Slovakia/Wikimedia_CEE_Meeting_2013#Not_funded</a></div>

<div><br></div><div>(go, read it.  I'll wait!)</div><div><br></div><div>So, that's the bitter part.  The sweet is that there's a path forward -- if this metacommunity (i.e. community of communities) is truly interested in the skill-sharing, cross-pollination, and regional collaboration we have been talking about, it will need to _show_ it much more energetically.  The CEE idea cannot be borne by three or four dedicated individuals.  </div>

<div><br></div><div>It really is up to you: use the upcoming meeting (those of you who are going anyway), and this (rather inactive) mailing list, and figure it out -- DO we (where we = more than a single person from each of a three or four chapters) want CEE to be a real thing, and if so, WHAT do we want to do/achieve with it, AND what are we willing to DO toward those goals.<br clear="all">

<div><br></div><div>If and when I see evidence of this energy, I will support it in any way I can, including funding a fuller CEE event (even in a few months!), and of course participating myself.</div><div><br></div><div>

I will also mention two examples of comparable attempts:  </div><div><br></div><div>on the one hand, Iberocoop -- the group of chapters, proto-chapters and user groups speaking Spanish, Portuguese, and Italian -- who have a fairly active mailing list, and have been engaging in some regional cooperation (mostly around printed materials, experience sharing, WLM, and education programs), and have recently had their third regional conference (Iberoconf).  I participated in that conference (held in the participants own languages), and I was impressed with the level of discussion and the concrete plans hatched during the event.  I also found it useful to have been present, including quite a few one-on-one conversations I have been able to have with various delegates.</div>

<div><br></div><div>It should be acknowledged that Iberocoop enjoys the fact that most of the groups collaborate over two shared, major Wikipedias (the Spanish and the Portuguese Wikipedias), making mutual trust and understanding easier (shared experiences, familiarity with policies and history) and facilitating easier sharing of materials and resources.  This is not quite the case in CEE, where most groups are not sharing a major Wikipedia with other groups, albeit there are still the linguistic kinship (for the Slavic groups, at least) and some cultural similarities.  Also, I am certainly not saying Iberocoop is perfect (its imperfections were much discussed in Iberoconf, in fact...)</div>

<div><br></div><div>On the other hand, the group that has been calling itself (without authorization, ahem) "Wikimedia Asia" for several years now.  This label comes to life twice a year, before Wikimania and the Wikimedia Conference, when its 2-3 proponents try to get people to "do something as Wikimedia Asia".  There was talk of regional conferences, of joint projects, etc., -- the sort we've mentioned in the context of CEE as well.  However, nothing happened.  No collaboration has ever taken place, no conferences were had, and other than a few "Wikimedia Asia" lunches during Wikimania events, it was an empty label.  </div>

<div><br></div><div>This past Wikimania, in Hong Kong, there was a "Wikimedia Asia" session, where, again, ideas were discussed, but little progress was made.  Trying to get the obvious good intentions in the room onto practical lines, I proposed a cultural exchange project, where each of us would enlist our communities to translate some key articles about each other's country or culture (mediated through the English Wikipedia), the benefits being that it's an entirely-online project requiring no funding and no complicated set-up.  Nevertheless, almost three months later, it is clear the project is not a success:</div>

<div><a href="https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimedia_Asia_Project/Cultural_Content_Exchange">https://meta.wikimedia.org/wiki/Wikimedia_Asia_Project/Cultural_Content_Exchange</a><br></div><div>(the two most active participants are Vishnu, a CIS employee in India, and... yours truly.)</div>

<div><br></div><div>I am bringing this up to demonstrate to you that I am not exclusively critical of the CEE group, and that there are models with both more and less energy than CEE currently shows.  It is up to you whether CEE becomes more like Iberocoop or more like "Wikimedia Asia".</div>

<div><br></div><div>I look forward to discussion of the future of WMCEE, as well as to any news from the Modra meeting once it takes place.</div><div><br></div><div>Warmly,</div><div><br></div><div>   Asaf</div>-- <br><div dir="ltr">

    Asaf Bartov<br>    <a href="http://www.wikimediafoundation.org" target="_blank">Wikimedia Foundation</a><br><div><br></div><div><div>Imagine a world in which every single human being can freely share in the sum of all knowledge. Help us make it a reality!</div>

<div><a href="https://donate.wikimedia.org" target="_blank">https://donate.wikimedia.org</a></div></div></div>
</div></div>